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(Events and Corresponding Methods)
(Events and Corresponding Methods)
 
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| handle it by registering a listener according to [https://www.zkoss.org/wiki/ZK_Client-side_Reference/General_Control/Event_Listening Event Listening]
| handle it by registering a listener according to [https://www.zkoss.org/wiki/ZK_Client-side_Reference/General_Control/Event_Listening Event Listening]
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ZK fires it in afterMount, starting from the inner-most child then its parent, and so on.
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| handle it by registering a listener according to [https://www.zkoss.org/wiki/ZK_Client-side_Reference/General_Control/Event_Listening Event Listening]
| handle it by registering a listener according to [https://www.zkoss.org/wiki/ZK_Client-side_Reference/General_Control/Event_Listening Event Listening]
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ZK fires it when each time ZK completes rendering/re-rendering a widget.
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ZK fires it when each time ZK completes rendering/re-rendering a widget, starting from a parent then its child, and so on.
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Latest revision as of 09:12, 19 May 2020





Contents


A widget event is the widget-level event (Event).

Like Event at the server side, the widget event can be anything, and can be triggered by a widget or an application to notify a widget-level or application-level event, such as that a window has been moved.

In addition, ZK Client Engine intercepts most DOM events and encapsulate them into widgets events, such that it is easier and more efficient for component developers to handle events at widget-level (rather than DOM-level, Event).

Event Listening for Component Developers

ZK Client Engine intercepts most DOM events that are targeting the DOM elements belong to widgets. It then encapsulates them into widget events, and then invokes the corresponding method of Widget. For example, when the user moves the mouse over a DOM element of a widget, Widget.doMouseOver_(Event) will be called. Similarly, when the user clicks a DOM element of a widget, Widget.doClick_(Event) will be called.

Listen by Overriding a Method

Thus, the simplest way to listen a DOM event is to override the corresponding method. For example,

doMouseDown_: function (evt) {
    //do whatever you want
    this.$supers('doMouseDown_', arguments); //invoke parent.fireX() and so on
}

where evt is an instance of Event. The original DOM event can be retrieved by the use of Event.domEvent, and the original DOM element can be found by the use of Event.domTarget (or evt.domEvent.target).

If you want to listen and disable the default behavior, just not to call the super class:

doClick_: function (evt) {
    this.fireX(evt);
    //don't call this.$supers to avoid the event propagation
},

Note that this approach is suggested for better performance since no real DOM-level event registration is required (as described in the next section).

Event Propgation

The default implementation of the event methods (doXxxx_ in Widget) propagates the event from the target widget to its parent, grandparent and so on. To stop the propagation, you can either invoke Event.stop(Map), or not calling back the superclass's event method (the effect is the same). In other words, if the propagation is stopped, the parent's event method won't be called.

If a widget event is not stopped and required by the server, it will be sent to the server, and converted to an instance of AuRequest at the server[1].

In addition to the event propagation, the default implementation will invoke Widget.fireX(Event, int) to inoke the application-level listeners, if any (registered with Widget.listen(Map, int).

Notice that there are two kinds of propagation: widget-level and DOM-level. If you stop only the widget-level propagation (by calling evt.stop({propagation:true})), the DOM event will go through all DOM-level event listeners and then trigger the browser default behavior.


  1. For more information, please refer to the AU Requests section.

Capture the Mouse Event

Sometime you want the following Widget.doMouseOver_(Event) and Widget.doMouseUp_(Event) are called against the same widget, no matter where the mouse-up event happens. This is also known as capturing. It can be done by setting zk.mouseCapture as follows.

doMouseDown_: function () {
    zk.mouseCapture = this;
    this.$supers('doMouseDown_', arguments);
}

Notice that the mouse capture is reset automatically after Widget.doMouseUp_(Event) is called.

Capture the Input Event

Sometime you want the following Widget.onKeyPress_(Event) and Widget.onKeyUp_(Event) to be called against the same widget, no matter where the key-up event happens. It is also known as capturing. It can be done by setting zk.keyCapture as follows.

doKeyDown_: function () {
    zk.keyCapture = this;
    this.$supers('doKeyDown_', arguments);
}

Notice that the key capture is reset automatically after Widget.onKeyUp_(Event) is called.

Events and Corresponding Methods

Events that can be handled by overriding a method
DOM Event Name ZK Widget Event Name Method to Override
blur onBlur Widget.doBlur_(Event)

Note: unlike others, you have to register a listener with Widget.domListen_(DOMElement, String, Object) as follows. Otherwise, doBlur_ won't be called.

this.domListen_(n, "onBlur");
click onClick Widget.doClick_(Event)
dblclick onDoubleClick Widget.doDoubleClick_(Event)
contextmenu (aka., the right click) onRightClick Widget.doRightClick_(Event)
focus onFocus Widget.doFocus_(Event)

Note: unlike others, you have to register a listener with Widget.domListen_(DOMElement, String, Object) as follows. Otherwise, doFocus_ won't be called.

this.domListen_(n, "onFocus");
mouseover onMouseOver Widget.doMouseOver_(Event)
mouseout onMouseOut Widget.doMouseOut_(Event)
mousedown onMouseDown Widget.doMouseDown_(Event)
mouseup onMouseUp Widget.doMouseUp_(Event)
mousemove onMouseMove Widget.doMouseMove_(Event)
keydown onKeyDown Widget.doKeyDown_(Event)
keyup onKeyUp Widget.doKeyUp_(Event)
keypress onKeyPress Widget.doKeyPress_(Event)
x onBind handle it by registering a listener according to Event Listening

ZK fires it in afterMount, starting from the inner-most child then its parent, and so on.

x onAfterSize handle it by registering a listener according to Event Listening

ZK fires it when each time ZK completes rendering/re-rendering a widget, starting from a parent then its child, and so on.

x onUnbind handle it by registering a listener according to Event Listening

ZK fires it when ZK removes a widget from a page.

Event Listening for Application Developers

To listen a widget event, you could invoke Widget.listen(Map, int) to listen any widget event you want. However, Widget.listen(Map, int) is designed for applications to listen events at the client. Thus, it is also called the application-level event listener.

For component development, the method overriding is suggested as described in the previous subsections.

The signature of an event listener is as follows.

function (event) { //an instance of zk.Event
}

Event Firing

To fire a widget event, you could invoke Widget.fire(String, Object, Map, int) or Widget.fireX(Event, int).

Then, the listeners registered with Widget.listen(Map, int) will be invoked one-by-one. Then, it will be sent to the server, if an event listener has been registered at the server or it is an import event[1].

A client-side event listener could stop sending a widget event to the server by invoking Event.stop(Map) with {au:true}, such as

evt.stop({au: true});

  1. For more information, please refer to the AU Requests section.

Version History

Last Update : 2020/5/19


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Copyright © Potix Corporation. This article is licensed under GNU Free Documentation License.